Archive for Grant Management

What if I were a Gift I gave to the world each
and every day?

What if the receiver experienced Forgiveness in
the presence of my gift?

What if emotional and physical Healing
happened as I was handed to a new recipient?

What if I received in return what I gave?

What gifts will I give today?

Source: Seven Stones Leadership Daily Sufficiency

 

Tis the season, and we have gifts for you in this installment of our LINKY Party! I don’t usually gush but my friends have really spilled the beans here and shared some truly valuable planning and design tools – that are the amalgamation of years of experience – so definitely check them out.

These five incredibly useful tools that will help you develop more compelling and competitive grant proposals. If this gift seems like a boring pair of socks to you, remain patient, we all use these tools to run successful grant writing businesses – they work and will save you time and make you more effective and efficient – so you have more time to enjoy the joys of life.

From Jo Miller: A Social Media Template – Strategy and Planning

From Heather Stombaugh: A Grant Decision-Making Matrix

From Diane Leonard: Two Grant Readiness Tools for new and seasoned organizations

From Mark Whitacre: A Grant Alignment System Spreadsheet/Process

From me, Jana: How much to charge for grant writing contracts tool

How to figure out how much to charge for grant writing contracts

One of the questions that I get asked the most is how much to charge for grant writing. It’s always a little tricky to answer because the Sarbanes-Oxley Act precludes discussion of rates in order to stop price fixing…which we can all agree is never a pretty thing.

Having said that, I have learned a few things when negotiating contracts that have served me well over the years and I’d like to share those with you.

Number One: Figuring out how long a grant will take you to write

The first step here is to see who how long it takes you to write a grant application. I have collaborated with other grant writers over the years and found that it can vary quite a bit. So, if you are just starting out as a consultant, I recommend that you carefully track your hours to get a sense of how long things take you. On the scale of things, I am very fast, partly by nature and partly because I have been writing grants for 20 years so I’m just much more efficient.

Foundation Grants

For simple foundation grants I calculate a minimum of 15 hours and more typically in the 25-30 hour range. But, please track your own hours and find out what is true for you.

 

Government Grants

Government grants are a whole different kettle of fish. Diane Gideon Martin generously shared with me her formula for calculating how long it takes to write a state or federal grant and I have found it to be remarkably accurate. Her formula

“for calculating the time it will take me to complete the entire grant application. I’ve found that 2 hours per double-spaced page allows me to complete the narrative, abstract, all SF 424 forms, work with the client on the budget, edit the budget narrative, create attachments (MOUs/MOAs, logic model, bio sketches,etc.), and any other tasks necessary to get the application ready to go.”

I have tried this out for several years and it works like a charm for me.

 

Number Two: Know who you are working with

The biggest key determinant in how a grant process goes along is how easy a client is to work with. These days everyone is busy and getting a grant prepared often takes a lot of extra work on many people’s behalves. Everyone starts out with good intentions but along the way you may end up doing a lot more work than you bargained for.

Number Three: Good fences make good neighbors

Given that, whenever I am working with a brand new client I will increase my initial quote by 20% and tell them that it is high because they are an unknown entity. I tell them that if they are responsive, helpful, and provide what I need on time, then the process will do smoothly and I will not charge them the full estimate. However, if they aren’t then I have a cushion and don’t feel resentment if things go awry.

When I do charge on an hourly basis, I have a sentence in my contract that says the client shall deliver requested materials within 24 hours of my request. If the client fails to deliver the requested materials within that time, my recorded hours will be multiplied by 1.5.

I also tell clients that I do not work on weekends and that I do not work in the evenings…and I don’t.

Now, these might sound a little hardball to you, but I can only do my best work when my needs are taken care of. And when I do my best work, I take care of the needs of many people in our communities. So, all of these conditions make for really happy client relationships for me and by extension the people that I serve through my work.

On several occasions, I have not charged a new client my full initial estimate because they were easy and fun to work with and their team was responsive and professional. And on a couple of occasions, I was really, really glad that I had built in a cushion.

Only once, have I actually charged extra on an hourly contract when a client wasn’t responsive – they didn’t object because they knew that they had let the ball drop and that I had picked it up and run anyway. I also did tell them that they could expect a higher bill so that it wasn’t a surprise.

And, on the issue of working evenings and weekends, I have found clients to be remarkably respectful. Only on a couple of occasions has someone asked me to work on the weekend and they have done so with the acknowledgement that it was in extraordinary circumstances (severe illness and a family’s member’s death in the team) and so I was happy to accommodate them.

I hope that these practices and tools are useful to you in developing healthy, harmonious and respectful relationships with your clients in 2015.

 

MORE GIFTS

As always, my book is always available on a gift basis.

And, I’m also offering 30 minute introductory session with me for people who are interesting in Grant Coaching. Don’t worry  it is not a sales pitch – it is an opportunity for me to answer your questions and to get to know each other.

And finally, if you are looking for the perfect experiential gift for the person who has everything, consider giving an Insight Session with me. I’ve just been doing some interviews with clients and a couple of words keep cropping up – mind-blowing and life-changing.  One person said

I am a social scientist with an Ivy league Ph.D. and a skeptic at heart.
 
My session with Jana was mind-blowing. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind as to her abilities.
 
It was one of the most healing, joyful hours of my life.

If you’re intrigued check it out.

Please pass along the 2014 Grant Professionals Gifts to anyone who could find value from this post and the other posts in Link Party.

I wish you all a warm and joyous season of giving and receiving!

 

Jana

In order to become a certified grant professional, people have to demonstrate my competency in 8 areas as defined by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute.  These eight competencies are critical to the work we do. Five GPC’s have written a series of short articles about the competencies to coincide with weekly grantchats on each one on twitter. The links to the articles are below:

1: Effective Grant Applications by Diane Leonard

2: Program & Project Design & Development – Jo Miller

3: Funding Resources  – Diane Leonard

4: Organization Development – Jo Miller

5: Ethical Practices – Heather Strombaugh

6: Grant Management – Jana Hexter

7: Cultivate & Maintain Relationships – Mark Whitacre

8: Raise the Level of Professionalism – Heather Strombaugh Read More→

I often get asked about grants for businesses and for-profit ventures. It’s not in area that I have ventured into so when I met Micki Vandeloo and she told me this is her area of expertize, I asked her to write an article for you. If you’re a social entrepreneur or corporation, take a look and see if there might be opportunities for your organization to explore. Here’s Micki’s article…I hope it’s helpful to you. Read More→

Aug
29

Interesting Grant Resource

Posted by: | Comments (0)

This week is a quiet week and I’m sure that many of you are off with your families enjoying the last wisps of summer. So, instead of writing a long post I’m going to recommend a great resource that you may not have heard about.

The Grant Professionals Certification Institute has an excellent literature review created by Michael Wells, GPC, CFRE, MA. It includes a summary of how the profession has grown and changed and an excellent list of books and resources about the field broken into to subcategories such as Writing Style, Federal Grants, Grants Management, Funder Perspectives etc.. It’s certainly not beach reading for the long weekend but if you haven’t perused this resource, it’s definitely worth a look. You can find it here.

I wish you and your family a lovely long holiday weekend.

So, the blog has been a little quiet for a couple of months. I’ve been doing a lot of presentations about the Recovery Act around the Northeast. So, in lieu of an article, this blog is a list of links of my favorite sources of information about the Recovery Act. I’ll be offering a webinar on the Recovery Act on June 16th – the details will be posted in a few days.

General
Council on Foundation Stimulus Reports

http://www.councilofnonprofits.org/stimulus

State Councils of NonProfits
http://www.nycon.org/ – they are also offering some free webinars on distinct topics within the stimulus

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities – Stimulus Watch Series of Reports
http://www.cbpp.org/

For a detailed list of spending see
http://www.propublica.org/special/the-stimulus-plan-a-detailed-list-of-spending#stim_education

and  http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/STIMULUS_FINAL_0217.html

Some great links are included in this article
http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/h/blog/how-your-nonprofit-can-access-stimulus-funding

State Information
Council of State Governments: http://www.staterecovery.org
This includes overview of how each state is managing the stimulus and articles from the media. You can also view progress by subject area i.e. all energy initiatives by state.

This page gives a list of deadlines that states need to adhere to http://www.staterecovery.org/key-deadlines

The foundation center has a nice site of best resources by state http://maps.foundationcenter.org/economic_crisis/stimulus/shell.php?state=new_york

The National Conference of State Legislatures also has an excellent site with information about ARRA and it’s implementation.
http://www.ncsl.org/statefed/2009economicstimulus.htm

Many elected officials have created excellent handbooks, for example
Senator Gillibrand in NY
Congresswoman Castor in FL
Read More→